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Songs for the Lord’s Supper Part 3

Songs for the Lord’s Supper Part 3
Mar 19 Tags: LS Songs | 7 Responses Print Save as PDF

Here is the third of a series on new songs that are appropriate and worshipful to sing at the Lord’s Supper.  You can see all the articles in the series – LS Songs. These songs are picked based on the words (not all will agree on every line) and the tunes. They are singable by a congregation even though some may be easier than others.

  1. Hallelujah for the Cross by Ross King and Todd Wright
    • This song has become a big favourite in our assembly
  2. Boldly I Approach by Rend Collective
    • A prayer of worship and surrender to the Savior
  3. Man of Sorrows (Lamb of God) by Brooke Ligertwood and Matt Crocker
    • Beautiful words with an easy tune to sing
  4. At the Cross (Love Ran Red) by Chris Tomlin, Ed Cash, Jonas Myri and Matt Armstrong
  5. Jesus Thank You by Pat Sczebel
    • You will be singing this song all day as thanksgiving to the Lord
  6. Behold Our God by Jonathan Baird, Meghan Baird, Ryan Baird and Stephen Altrogge
  7. O Praise The Name (Anástasis) by Benjamin Hastings, Dean Ussher and Marty Sampson
    • A very powerful song
  8. Death Was Arrested by Adam Kersh, Brandon Coker, Heath Balltzglier and Paul Taylor Smith
    • This song will get your hearts stirred.
  9. Overcome by Jeremy Camp
  10. Mighty to Save by Ben Fielding and Reuben Morgan

Crawford Paul

Crawford is an elder at Rolling Meadows Bible Chapel in Ontario and has a passion for the assemblies. He and his wife Beth serve in various ways within the assembly to build up and encourage the believers. He is president of Legacy Ministries Canada, an organization focused on helping individual Christians, local churches and Christian organizations with financial, legal and governance matters. Check it out at legacycanada.org

7 Responses to Songs for the Lord’s Supper Part 3

  1. beckyjenkinson

    Amen! Thanks, Crawford. Agreed!

  2. Don Huntington

    Many of the “old hymns” were written from experiences and heart-felt love for the Lord Jesus Christ and His worth and work. Many of the “new hymns” seem to be written otherwise. That could possibly be the reason that older more experienced believers like the “old ones”.

  3. I appreciate the list. Not all of these would work for our assembly (from a logistics standpoint, that is. We use hymnals and some of these are more than 2 pages through CCLI). Oh, that someone with better resources would supplement the aging “Hymns of Worship and Remembrance” and “Hymns of Truth and Praise”.. There are many new songs that would benefit believers both young and old.

  4. Barbara

    The Lord’s Supper, aka Remembrance Feast, is to remember what the Lord Jesus had done for us and to praise and worship the Father for His precious gift. All should be focused on Him and His work on the cross as well as His resurrection. I’m of the mind that if the words have more “i”, “we”, “me” etc than the Lord it’s not focusing on the right person. Some of the songs listed (in my ever humble opinion) don’t seem to fit the above criteria. As for tunes, lots of the current songs are difficult to sing even with music, can you imagine trying to sing them acapella? All this is not to say assemblies shouldn’t try new songs, they can if that’s what the Lord would have them to do. It would be a good idea to have a hymn sing to practice any new songs before introducing them at the Lord’s Supper meeting. In any case, it would be a matter of prayer for the elders and the assembly to introduce new (i.e. contemporary) songs into any part of the meeting.

    • Bernadette Veenstra
      Bernadette Veenstra

      While I appreciate your criteria, it reflects your personal preference. Maybe some of these songs don’t fit your criteria, but it doesn’t mean that they shouldn’t be sung-or shouldn’t be sung in the Lord’s Supper.
      Your point about lot of current songs being difficult to sing, even with music, is a good point. But, it isn’t true only of the new music. Many “old” songs lack something in sing-ability also. I am ALL for hymn sings to practice the hymns. My kids and I learn a new one every week, and also practice older hymns daily that we are more or less familiar with. I’m trying to arrange a hymn sing at my chapel to work on some of the unfamiliar hymns in our new hymn book. Even though our family knows the songs, we don’t feel like we can request them until more know them. Ergo: a hymnsing. =)

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